4 Tips for Helping Your Child Recover from Back Surgery

Experiencing surgery as an adult is a stressful experience. However, any adult would say that putting their child through surgery is an incredibly difficult undertaking. For many parents, having a child that requires back surgery provokes a lot of anxiety. Having to tell your child everything will be ok while managing your own fears can be an emotionally exhausting experience. Whether your child is having a routine procedure or more complicated surgery, it’s important to have some strategies for preparing them for the procedure and reducing their fears and anxieties. Here are four tips for helping your child recover from back surgery.

Ask Your Doctor Questions

Often, kids can sense when their parents are worried and stressed, and if your child needs surgery, the last thing you want is for them to sense your own apprehensions. Most anxiety stems from the unknown. There’s no better way to minimize some of the stress about your child’s procedure than to ask your child’s doctor and nurses a lot of questions. The more you know, the better you can prepare your child for surgery and calm some of their nerves. Understanding what is going to happen during the procedure will help you feel more at peace with the situation.

Don’t Hide Any Details of the Procedure

While it’s tempting to hide the details of the surgery from your child, it usually only causes more anxiety. Often, children can sense when their parents are being open and honest about what the procedure will entail, leading them to believe their condition is worse than it actually is. While you may think you are doing them a favor by choosing not to relay the details about the procedure, it’s almost always better to be honest about what’s going to happen. Sit your child down and in a calm manner, explain what will happen in language they can relate to. For example, if you have a young child, you can use phrases like “the doctor is going to fix you or make you better. Building trust with your child by giving them a full picture of what’s going to happen is the best way to minimize unnecessary anxieties.

Acknowledge and Ease Their Fears

Being scared or anxious about getting surgery isn’t exclusive to children. Whether you’re 16 or 60, it’s completely normal to be apprehensive about getting a procedure. As a parent, it’s important to acknowledge your child’s fears and do your best to ease their anxieties. For kids, one of the most common fears surrounding surgery is the pain. Additionally, many children fear that they will wake up during surgery. The best way to address these fears is by explaining to your child the role of the anesthesiologist along with its safety and effectiveness in preventing them from feeling anything while the procedure is happening.

Advocate for Them

As a parent, you are your child’s best advocate. Before, during, and post-procedure it’s essential to ask a lot of questions and ensure you understand everything that will be happening. Additionally, post-procedure it’s important to keep in touch with your doctor and make sure your child is on track to experience a normal recovery time.

Consult the Trusted Spine Surgeons at OLSS for Your Child’s Back Surgery

As a parent, putting your child through a surgery can be an extremely stressful and emotional experience. It’s essential to have a doctor you trust and can help guide you through ensuring your child makes a full recovery. If your child needs back surgery, you should consult with one of the skilled spine experts at OLSS.

When you schedule an appointment at your local Orthopedic and Laser Spine Surgery branch, you will receive an expert medical diagnosis. At all of our facilities, you’ll find highly skilled board-certified surgeons who are trained in cutting-edge medical procedures for neck and back treatment. We pride ourselves on our ability to orchestrate personalized care plans that serve the unique needs of our patients.

To schedule an appointment with one of our skilled spine experts, call (855) 853-6542 or fill out our online contact form.